Understanding and reading Frequencies, Polarities and Symbol rates from Lyngsat

Understanding and reading Frequencies, Polarities and Symbol rates from Lyngsat

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From the image snippet above, these are the instructions on how to read frequencies from Lyngsat if you are a beginner.
The first column contains the Frequency of the transponder, Tp in short. By now you already know the difference between C band and Ku band frequencies.
The second column usually contains the Operator logo or Channel logo. It’s not a must the logo be there, there are some channels that lack this feature. The operator logo indicates that that particular company operates the frequency in question. Examples of operators are Nilesat, Daarsat, Viasat, Satlink,and RRsat.
The third column shows the providers name and channel name. The providers name is usually at the top of the channel names.
The fourth column usually has some icons with the letters S or A inside. The S stands for stream if you click on it you will be taken to a webpage where you can stream that particular channel. A on the other hand stand for Address, of you click on it you will be presented with the physical address of the channel in question.
The fifth column shows the system encryption in place. For free to air satellite channels, the most common encryptions you should know are Mpeg2 (dvbs), Mpeg4 (dvbs2) and HD. If you are a hacker  then familiarize yourself with the encryption models that pay TV companies use. Some examples of encryption models are Nagravision, BISS, Conax, Irderto, Panaccess, Betacrypt among others. There is also an icon with the letter F inside on this column but not on every channel. The letter F stands for Free. This symbolizes that the operator or channel is available on Satellite for free. I think this F comes from the phrase free to air.
The sixth column shows the Symbol rate and FEC (Forward Error Correction) rate at the top of every bunch of channels or single channel. Below these two important figures are the elementary streams, SID and VPID. SID stands for Service identifier. VPID stands for Video Packet Identifier.
The next column is very important. It shows the APID, Audio packet identifier as well as the Language. This is the most important thing you should check when hunting for FTA channels. It’s no use having thousands of channels when you cannot understand the language.
The second last column shows the beam or footprint that the channels are on. Some beams are very strong and some are very weak (read fringe satellite reception) and thus require bi satellite dishes.
The last column gives credit to the person who updated the information as well as the date it was updated in this format YYMMDD. If the date is recent then the colour of this column is a bright turquoise colour then there was a very recent update.

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